The porn ban / reverse ban of OnlyFans is a mystery


Well, that’s easy. OnlyFans allowed sexual harassment afterwards. But we don’t know much about why the content subscription service made the sudden policy change in the first place-nor how it reversed its decision in a few days.

Here’s what we found out: Less than a week later it was announced that on October 1 it would effectively cut most of the pornography content the service used (and that helped drive the company’s valuation of more than $ 1 billion), OnlyFans returned.

In the first announcement of the ban on Aug. 19, OnlyFans said it was an effort “to follow the requests of our banking partners and payers.” CEO Tim Stokely later told the Financial Times that the banks were to blame, saying that they made it difficult — impossible for OnlyFans to transfer money to the creators. He also said they closed bank accounts belonging to sex workers.

But on August 25, adhere more on dagmal sa (as well as the threat of losing much of its revenue), OnlyFans say so “ensured the commitments necessary to support our diverse producer community” and it suspended the ban on the subject of sexual misconduct. But OnlyFans declined to tell Recode more than that, including what, if any, was done or was done to secure those assurances from the bank’s partners – or who the bank’s partners were.

One of the banks Stokely mentioned as being so difficult, BNY Mellon, would not comment on Recode if it reached a class agreement with OnlyFans. A spokesman for JPMorgan, who Stokely told the Financial Times was “more aggressive” about closing accounts belonging to sex or business workers who supported them, told Recode that the company had no way adult entertainment is prohibited.

Meanwhile, the media coverage of the ban covers one of the possible reasons why OnlyFans may have decided to enforce it: a lengthy BBC investigation, was published shortly after OnlyFans announced that it would ban most pornography. The BBC reported that OnlyFans had not done enough to ensure that its creators were of legal age or that all content posted on the platform was legal. It was also reported that the company was slow to ban creators found to be in violation of its policies. The report was based on accounts from OnlyFans moderators and released content documents that the BBC said were banned or illegal content on the platform and OnlyFans recommended its moderators to provide the creators who posted the illegal content three warnings before it was banned.

OnlyFans have denied most of the BBC’s allegations and will not tell Recode whether the BBC report influenced its initial decision to ban pornography. It teaches its Recode Terms of Service detail of verification process for creators, including submitting photographs in both ID forms and a photograph of the creator holding the IDs, and stating that it has a “zero tolerance policy” on prohibited content. OnlyFans also said it uses specific technologies to detect child sexual abuse material (CSAM), including Microsoft’s PhotoDNA. Fans are also sharing this transparency report, which includes optional CSAM details available on its platform (e.g. only 15 Fans accounts were closed for possible CSAM in July 2021, for example).

But the BBC report (as well as a 2020 BBC documentary about the company) indicates that despite existing policies, users are still uploading illegal content. OnlyFans won’t tell Recode how many people it uses or contracts to moderate the content. Nor does it say whether it will take over more of them or change its policies in any way to ensure skittish banking partners are confident that everything on the site is legal.

A report like the BBC could hurt a company like OnlyFans. Just look at Pornhub – YouTube for porn, really – being cut off from using Mastercard, Visa, and Discover payment processing services after The New York Times report last December it was said that the site had not done enough to curb offensive content containing children or immature adults. Pornhub tried it out undo some damage by removing all content from unverified accounts and promising to hire multiple moderators, but credit card companies have yet to return their services to the site. Subscribers to Pornhub’s premium service must wire funds from their bank or use cryptocurrency.

There is also a pending deadline from Mastercard who may be playing with the sudden change in the OnlyFans policy (the first): Mastercard announced back in April that on October 15 it will start new requirements for adult interior entrepreneurs. These requirements include verifying age and identification, reviewing content prior to publication, and dealing with reports of illegal or unusual content within seven business days. Considering how OnlyFans reportedly has 2 million creators, meeting the requirements – especially looking at all the content before publishing – is a daunting task.

The National Center for Sexual Exploitation equated Mastercard’s reversal of OnlyFans’ decision with an earlier statement about the ban, even though OnlyFans itself did not mention Mastercard first and later said OnlyFans “fully complied” of the new Mastercard rules.

Any pressure from Mastercard may be indirect, according to Mastercard.

“We don’t have OnlyFans talks,” a company spokesman told Recode. “Actually, we don’t have a direct relationship with them. We only know part of the decision they made through media coverage on Thursday.”

Mastercard has not commented on the future content review policy in advance and how that will affect OnlyFans, where offers a livestreaming service.

That is, in fact, our source of complaints or guarantees from bank partners as OnlyFans themselves, and OnlyFans say nothing else. And in the process of trying to satisfy certain parties (whoever they are), the company has managed to fool everyone.

Anti-sex work organizations that rejoiced at last week’s ban are now back in the company’s fight; the National Center on Sexual Exploitation told Recode that it “remains committed to holding OnlyFans accountable for driving abuse and exploitation.”

Sex workers can’t trust that OnlyFans won’t do anything like this again (the company just “suspended” the ban, which isn’t the same as canceling it), and they now know that OnlyFans are willing to throw them out – the people that most of the company is founded on – unless the banks allegedly demand it. Some of the people have already switched their services to other platforms after the content ban; they can continue that migration even if the ban is lifted. Fansly, which runs on a platform similar to OnlyFans and has seems to hug worker’s interior designer, states it has had a “giant surge” in manufacturer applications since the ban was announced.

And the millions of people who put OnlyFans “fans” are left to wonder if the site’s content has been properly reviewed – and how much longer they can keep an eye on it.





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